Tag Archives: gallery

Inside Marty Knapp’s Photo Gallery

Jean and I spent Thanksgiving afternoon readying the gallery walls for the opening of my GLASS Photography Exhibit. Here are some photos taken after we spiffed everything up for our opening reception on Saturday, November 29th at 3PM. Hope you can make it! And, if you can’t, please enjoy this little photo tour I put together especially for you.
If you click these photos, some nice larger ones will open for your enjoyment!

Front window and entrance to Marty Knapp Photo Gallery.

Front window and entrance to Marty Knapp Photo Gallery.

Years ago, the building that houses our gallery was home to a cafe and bar. It was owned by a man named Angelo, hence the “Angie’s” logo set in tile on our landing.

Left corner of lobby

Left corner of lobby

The lobby area is where we’ll set up refreshments during our Saturday opening.

Right corner of lobby.

Right corner of lobby.

The large ball appears to be floating, but it is the magic of the light creating the effect.

Entry into main gallery room.

Entry into main gallery room.

As you enter the lobby, the main gallery is to your right. Take a peak before you enter.

Reception counter and back wall to main wall

Reception counter and back wall to main wall

When you come in, either Jean or I will be sitting behind the desk. We welcome all our visitors warmly. Please come in and enjoy the world we have created on these dark chocolate colored walls.

Front, window wall and counter. Books, folios, notecards.

Front, window wall and counter. Books, folios, notecards.

At the back is a counter laden with framed miniatures, folios of prints, books and notecards. A complete catalog sits on a bookstand in the center of the counter. To the left is a bin with hundreds of large reference prints, including many not hanging on our walls.

South corner, flare photographs

South corner, flare photographs

The shorter gallery wall and shelf feature photographs of the unusual flare-like effects created as light passes through glass objects. Some of these effects were created by light passing through quartz crystals.

After the Rain

Last week brought some welcome rain to Point Reyes. We’ve been suffering from a drought that has all of us carefully watching our water usage. This rain freshened the air, brought the birds out and created lots of smiles on main street! I broke away from the studio to explore the Nicasio Reservoir. No, the water level didn’t rise appreciably, but the sky was filled with beautiful post-storm clouds and the light was gorgeous.  Here’s one of the photographs I made using the panorama feature on my new Sony A7R camera. Click the image to see a larger version.

Nicasio and Black Mountain Pano 95

Abbotts Lagoon at Daybreak

I had the good fortune to greet the sunrise at Abbotts Lagoon this last Saturday morning. I was coaching two photographers on a field photography workshop. We arrived before daybreak and began walking west toward the Pacific. We had planned our walk to coincide with the changing light from the rising sun. As we started, a few stars were still visible in the darkened western sky.

Of all the places in the Point Reyes Seashore, none rivals Abbotts Lagoon for its quiet beauty, especially on an early spring morning. On our day, wisps of fog lifted from the ground as the sun began to warm us. We walked the one-mile trail from the parking lot to the sand dunes that line the lagoon and separate it from the Pacific Ocean. Along the way, there were moments of light and space so sweet that I dared only whisper to my friends. I feared that my full voice would shatter the peace that held us in this holy place. Here are a few photos I made during our walk.

Abbotts Lagoon 31514 825 AM

Abbotts Lagoon 31514 806 rAMGreat Blue at Abbotts Lagoon 2

Wild Sky Over Point Reyes

Jean and I were surprised to hear a knock on our front door last Friday, Valentine’s Day. I had just gotten back from the gallery and was putting away my laptop in my studio at the front of the house. As I walked back to see who our visitor was, I heard a familiar voice, “Well, just tell Marty about this. He should take a look.” It was Tom, our next-door neighbor. When he saw me he repeated what he told Jean. “There’s an incredible sky, never seen anything quite like it. You should take a look, maybe photograph it.”

I thanked him for the tip and abruptly went back to grab my infrared camera. In seconds I was out the door and heading out to find an unobstructed view of the sky. It was a half hour before sunset and the display above me was remarkable. I walked across the street to the Wetlands, and for about 10 minutes pointed my lens up. Tom was right. There’s no way to describe this with words. Here’s a few of the photographs. More photos of this wild sky are posted in my Zenfolio catalog: Skyscapes

wetlands Sky 14.25

wetlands Sky 14.39 Wetlands Sky 14.41 Wetlands Sky 14.24

Does the Print Matter in the Digital Era?

There’s been much talk lately about the demise of the photographic print and the rise of its would-be replacement, the electronically presented digital image. Some will tell you that the battle is already over and that soon there will be no printing and no prints. After all, they say, we already view most of our photographs on laptops, tablets, or, lordy-me, our smart phone screens.  I’ll admit that back-lit, digital photographs viewed on today’s lcd screens are stunning, but I’m not ready to write the obit for the traditional photographic print.

Although the trans-illuminated image and the photographic print each inform and communicate, they affect us in fundamentally different ways. The electronic image is powerful but transitory, depending on electrical charges to exist. It’s elusive, like a dream that’s gone when we awaken. On the other hand, the photographic print is tangible and persistent. We can feel it’s solidity, sense it’s presence. It is there when we want it, accessible as long as there is light. Each serves different purposes–one represents art, the other is art.

Prints are a feast for our senses, whether framed, jewel-like, behind glass, or available to hold and touch from their folders and boxes. I love the way they feel in my hands, their weight and texture. I even enjoy their signature scents. It’s good that they’re still there when I walk in a room and look up at the wall. I also like knowing that I am looking at the image the way the artist wanted me to see it. I just feel more connected to prints than I do to the digital images that appear and disappear on my computer screen.

Nevertheless, digital images on my lcd screen are indispensable to my work. I use digital imaging both for the creation and representation of my artwork. I know that these electronic images are not the actual art, but rather the processing tools for the finished pieces, my  prints. And it is deeply satisfying to express my feelings and thoughts using this technology to create real and enduring artifacts. I keep clear the distinction between digital image and print, not confusing one for the other.

I love the fact that these digital images do become tangible–appearing in a book, a folio, or a frame–for us to see, hold and touch. And, over time, the enduring presence of a tangible print on our wall, will grow with us in a way that a fleeting image can’t.

So, the next time you reach into your wallet to fish out that precious photo of someone you love, be glad that we still have and can make photographs on paper. It’s a tradition that isn’t going to go away anytime soon!

A Favorite View Disappears

The other day my wife, Jean, and I took a ride up Mount Vision Road to look for the view I had recorded over 20 years ago in my photograph, Point Reyes Sunset. But I’m getting ahead of myself….

I’ve been smitten with grand overviews since I was a little boy. I’m sure I got this fascination from my dad, who took our family to various overlooks to share the views that impressed him. Near our home in Connecticut, we observed the splendors visible from East Rock, a mile-long trap-rock ridge overlooking New Haven and the waters of Long Island Sound. Then, on a family trip to his brother’s place in El Paso, our whole family marveled at the magnificent view Dad showed us from the top of Scenic Drive. We were easily 10 times higher than the East Rock viewing spot.

Years later, when I first came to Point Reyes, I began exploring, searching for the most splendid views near my new home. When I discovered the main overlook of Drakes Estero and the Point on Mount Vision Road, I was bowled over. It quickly became one of my favorite vistas. I was amazed to see in one sweeping view, the magnificent land mass from the Limantour Estero to the south, across the rugged headlands of Point Reyes to Abbotts Lagoon in the north. The Park Service had cleared a little parking area and erected a sign to make it easy to find. I would bring my out-of-town guests there to share the beauty of Point Reyes from this expansive overview.

In the late 1980s I began photographing the view there. I drove to this outlook scores of times with my camera, seeking the best light to express the majesty there. I discovered that late afternoons were best. And so it was on a winter afternoon in January 1991, that everything came together. A storm front was moving out of the area, leaving broken skies and cloud remnants to the west. I walked to my favorite location and set my camera on the tripod. The sun was hidden behind a long ropy cloud. I felt hopeful that I would get my photograph as the sun dropped lower and emerged into the clear sky near the horizon. But before it did, I was surprised to witness god rays bursting in all directions from behind the cloud! I made several exposures and after developing the film, I found one negative that captured the moment perfectly. I titled that photograph, simply, Point Reyes Sunset, which has become a favorite among collectors of my work.

Point Reyes Sunset

Point Reyes Sunset – January, 1991 – Please Click for enlarged view

Now, some 20 years later, I wanted to show Jean where I had set the camera when I made Point Reyes Sunset. As we drove to the top, I also wondered if things had changed much since the Inverness Ridge Fire of 1995. We drove the switch-backed road up to the parking location. The park service sign was gone. Coyote bush had spread more than man tall everywhere. New-growth pines and a thicket of brush blocked the full panorama. I eventually found where I had stood to make this photograph. I felt grateful that I had recorded Point Reyes Sunset before the fire. Only fragments of my original view remain.

Here’s what it looks like now:

Looking north from Point Reyes Sunset location

South view from same position Point Reyes Sunset was exposed.

Looking south from Point Reyes Sunset location

Wading in Lagunitas Creek

Waders, Lagunitas Creek 130626_26

Two locals with their dog enjoy the cool waters of Lagunitas Creek in Point Reyes.

After yesterday’s rain, I walked down to the Green Bridge, which overlooks the widest area of Lagunitas Creek. The afternoon’s warmth attracted a couple of folks who came to cool off and play fetch with their golden retriever. Recorded with IR-converted Panasonic G1.